Archive for the ‘firewall’ Tag

Type 65 Coupe Update: Some Air Conditioner Work, Re-Installing the Firewall and Red Brake Lines   Leave a comment

Not much to report on the Type 65 Coupe Project. I have been doing a lot of other things over the last few weeks. The heat has been making me lazy.

I decided to do some work on the A/C unit for the Coupe. I cut and chopped the housing cover for several hours, and then decided it might be easier to just make a whole new cover using fiberglass and resin. . . . I did some research on composites, epoxy resins, fiberglass and boat repair, and lost-foam casting. Interestingly, I am doing the same research for some stuff at work. I will try my hand at making a custom duct for the A/C unit. I have a layout in my mind, but there are a lot more things that need to go behind the dash panel besides the A/C ducts. The new cover/duct will have to make several 90- and 180-degree bends. I hope to avoid the use of too many fittings by making a single duct/top cover for the A/C unit. Maybe it should be called a “manifold” instead.

Here are some pictures of the air conditioner and the “dry fit” of where it will mount.

IMG_0597 wayne yoshida Coupe AC 2

IMG_0599 wayne yoshida Coupe AC 3

 

I also re-installed the firewall. I had to take it off and re-paint it with a higher quality silver paint. I do not have pictures of this, but it does look better than before. The paint is “harder” than the other paint I used.

Next, I removed the “bad” brake hoses originally from the Complete Kit and replaced them with the proper red hose from the third technical bulletin from Factory Five Racing. This is the hose going from the reservoir to the master cylinders. The new hose is much softer and easily slipped over the fittings. I hope they won’t leak. We will find out soon when I fill and bleed the system.

IMG_0600 wayne yoshida Coupe - BAD brake lines1

 

IMG_0601 wayne yoshida Coupe - band brake lines2

 

IMG_0603 wayne yoshida new red brake lines 1

I also started to look at engine hoist options – I want to drop the engine in SOON!

 

 

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Type 65 Coupe Update: More Foot Box Work . . .   3 comments

. . . and a BBQ Dessert Experiment

Work on the passenger and driver side foot boxes continues on the Factory Five Racing Type 65 Coupe.

I painted the engine side of the panels with silver BBQ paint, and left the interior side un-painted, since all panels will be covered with Cool-It heat and sound barrier. Panels that face the exterior of the car – like the foot box floors and the trunk area, will be painted with RustOleum truck bed liner. It is a textured black finish that will also help reduce sound and noise. Here are some images. ..

kh6wz - giardiniera apple puffs foot boxes 003

kh6wz - giardiniera apple puffs foot boxes 002

On the left is a detail of one of the cookie sheet heat shields, fastened to the firewall with 8-32 riv-nuts. The spacing is about one-quarter-inch. On the right is a view of the top of the heat shield, showing the nicely rolled edge.

kh6wz - giardiniera apple puffs foot boxes 022

kh6wz - giardiniera apple puffs foot boxes 010

Passenger side foot box appears on the left of the photo above. The photo on the right shows a closer look at the passenger foot box.

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kh6wz - giardiniera apple puffs foot boxes 009

Photos above: Passenger foot box, before and after installing the Cool-It mats.

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Above left: The top seam on the passenger foot box – this will be either trimmed or a strip of aluminum will be used to cover the mis-match. On the right, I added srtips of aluminum angle to the outer wall of the driver side foor box. This should make the outer wall easier to install.

The next series of photos show how the interior panels go into place. The un-finished aluminum is difficult to photograph, I wish the manual would include an exploded view of the panels and how they fit into place. This is a complex jigsaw puzzle, and many of the parts must be flexed, trimmed and pulled into place. Clecos really help. This is one area where the manual offers good advice – the sections fit best when you follow the order outlined in the manual. Although many of the panels are marked with a part number, they do not indicate the orientation of the panel.

The foot box floors were very difficult to fit into place, so I sliced them into sections. If you look carefully you can see the saw kerfs (seams) on the floor panels. I chose the cuts carefully, in order to make sure I would have something solid to rivet to. In the areas without any supporting chassis tubes, I will install strips of aluminum bar stock.

The panels will be permanently attached later with silicone adhesive and rivets – at this stage, the panels are being “dry-fitted” with clecos to make sure everything is properly in place.

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kh6wz - giardiniera apple puffs foot boxes 001

Somewhere during this building session, I made some time to pack my hot giardiniera into jars, and made a few deliveries. . .

I also managed to do some BBQ experiments. This time I baked some apple turn-overs in the Big Green Egg. They turned out OK, but could be better. They are like just-right bites of apple pie. Here are some pictures. . .

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Type 65 Coupe Update: Foot Boxes, Firewall, Gas Pedal   Leave a comment

It’s been a few weeks since I posted an update. Some people have been asking for some news, so here we go. . .

I am preparing the chassis so I can install the engine and transmission. This means that I have to finish the firewall, which means prepping and painting the foot boxes and routing and mounting the brake and fuel lines.

I decided to finish the engine bay with silver Rust-Oleum high temperature BBQ paint. This is a change from my thoughts on powder coating and appliance epoxy. . . The appliance epoxy has an upper temperature limit of 200 degrees F, and I think engine bay heat is higher than an oven. The BBQ paint is good for 1200 degrees F or something like that. Depending on how the engine bay looks, I may strip everything off and re-finish with powder coat later. But for now, the silver BBQ paint looks OK. The nice weather last week allowed me to do some rattle-can spraying outside.

I permanently mounted my first aluminum panel – the driver’s side foot box front. I am using Permatex Ultra Black number 2105 silicone adhesive. This is what Kirkham Motors uses for their builds, so I will use what they use. It can be used as an adhesive as well as a gasket, so this extends its usefulness around the shop.

References: Kirkham online build  and Permatex Ultra Black goop

kh6wz-firewall panels 001

kh6wz-firewall panels 002

Above right is a close-up of the BBQ paint finish on one of the pedal box panels. Looks OK. There is a slight texture to the finish. The color is actually silver, the blue-ish tint is probably from sunlight diffracting from somewhere.

kh6wz-firewall panels 004

kh6wz-driver footbox front 001

Above left, a “dry fit” of the driver side foot box front panel. You can see the cookie sheet heat shields in place. Above right, using the panel as a pattern to cut the insulation mat – just place the panel onto the backing side of the mat, press down and then cut with shears or a knife. Final trimming is done with a utility knife.

kh6wz-fire wall insulation 002

kh6wz-gas pedal 003

Cool-It heat and sound insulation is applied to the interior side of the foot box panel. The “bubbles” you see are from the riv-nuts and screws poking out from the other side. On the right, I wanted to make sure the adhesive stuck properly at the top of the panel, so I used some clamps to squeeze evenly. My good friend Norm Abram always says, “You can never have too many clamps.”

The Accelerator Cable and Pedal

I mounted the accelerator cable as well as the Russ Thompson gas pedal, sold by Breeze Automotive. The instructions are different from what is being supplied by Factory Five Racing now. (I am getting used to this. . . )

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The picture above shows some of the gas pedal mounting parts that come with the Complete Kit. The Thompson / Breeze pedal instructions say something about a “green plastic barbed clip” at the end of the throttle cable. This green thing is no longer what comes with the kit. Instead, there is a little square “plug” that is too big to fit into the pedal mount.

Rather than cutting off the ball-end at the throttle cable or drill a bigger hole in the mount, I decided to carefully cut some of the plastic from the center barb so it would fit snugly into the mounting hole – not much has to be shaved off, it is something like a sixteenth of an inch or so. Then I made a slit in the square plastic thing as shown so the cable could slip in with the ball intact.

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As you can see above, I added a fender washer (painted black) to the throttle cable mounting point, this is just for looks.

This is Irritating

kh6wz-fire wall gas edal 015

For some reason, this bothered me today, but then I realized not many tubes of caulk gun goop come with caps.  Anyway, I used a pen cap to close the tube. I hope this works, I only needed a few beads for this build session.

Some Great Looking Door Panels on Order!

I ordered a set of leather door panels from Levy Racing earlier this week. They look like this:

Levy Racing Coupe Door Panels

Type 65 Coupe Project Update: Those Heat Shields, Rivet Nuts, Pedal Box and Accelerator Pedal   1 comment

Since the engine is in the middle of my garage, I really need to accelerate my building, or at least, get my chassis ready for engine installation.

I looked at my cookie sheet heat shields and the mounting locations filled with 8-32 riv-nuts, and thought – shoot, the riv-nuts actually have a shaft that might be used as stand-offs for the shield plates.  So I checked the length, and the threaded shafts are about a quarter-inch long, enough to be used as a spacer between the firewall and the heat shield. I may add another quarter-inch in certain places, if there is room.

So I spent a few hours removing all of the riv-nuts I installed a few weeks ago. Good thing I bought several hundred from McMaster-Carr. . . .

At least I am an expert on installing and extracting riv-nuts now.

Rivet Nuts and the Rivet Nut Tool

Here are some pictures of the riv-nut tool from McMaster-Carr and how it is used. Riv-nut fasteners are very handy if you need a threaded hole installed into a blind location, or when you do not have access to the back side of a mounting surface. I will use these fasteners for hatches and compartments in the trunk area of the Type 65 Coupe.

McMaster-Carr information

Wrench-drive rivet nut installation tool for 10-24 and 10-32 thread: 96349A203

Wrench-drive rivet nut installation tool for 8-32 thread: 96349A152

Wrench-drive rivet nut installation tool for 6-32 thread: 96349A101

Aluminum heavy-duty rivet nut, 6-32 internal thread, .080″-.130″ material thickness, packs of 25: 94020A315

Aluminum heavy-duty rivet nut, 8-32 internal thread, .080″-.130″ material thickness, packs of 25: 94020A323

Aluminum heavy-duty rivet nut, 8-32 internal thread, .020″-.080″ material thickness, packs of 25: 94020A319

kh6wz 010-riv-nut tool kh6wz 009-riv-nuts

kh6wz 013-riv-nut tool kh6wz 014-riv-nut tool

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  kh6wz 017-riv-nut tool removing

kh6wz 019-riv-nut installed  kh6wz 018-crooked riv-nut

Above left – a picture of a properly installed riv-nut, viewed from the reverse (back) side. At right, a riv-nut improperly installed, viewed from the face (front) side. This one must be removed by drilling the riv-nut out. Below left, use a twist drill slightly smaller than the mounting hole, in this case, a 1/4-inch bit is being used to drill out the riv-nut. By slightly rocking the drill, the riv-nut will break apart and, usually, just fall out of its hole.

kh6wz 003 - removing riv nuts  kh6wz 004 - removing riv-nuts

Give Me a Brake: The Wilwood Pedal Box

The pedal box is a challenge to install with the Factory Five Racing Assembly Manual, revision 3E, July 2011 – since there are no assembly instructions for the Wilwood Complete Kit pedal box.

Fortunately, a dedicated Type 65 Coupe builder named Chris has an excellent photo album of his Coupe build, with many detailed images. Without his documentation – it would have been impossible to assemble this part of the kit. Take a look at cbergquist1’s photostream on Flickr.

 Here are some pictures of my pedal box, including a trouble spot I ran into, and how I had to fix it. . . .

kh6wz 006- coupe pedal box  kh6wz 005-coupe pedal box adj masters

kh6wz 015-coupe pedal box

This is the clutch quadrant adjuster (above). This Nylok had to be ground down to fit properly. The hole in the adjuster plate is too close to the master cylinder mounting plate.  A better solution would be to eliminate the Nylok altogether and thread the small plate. Then the lock nut and Allen bolt are used to make clutch travel adjustments.

kh6wz 016-coupe pedal box  kh6wz 017-coupe pedal box

Now I have to find a place to mount the master cylinder reservoir. There are some rare posts about this, but most of them are for the Factory Five Racing Roadster.

I think I will mount mine at or near the peak of the driver’s side footbox/firewall. This location should be away from too much heat, and should be in the clear for fluid bleeding, checks and re-filling. We will see. . .

The Gas Pedal

kh6wz 007-coupe accelerator pedal parts  kh6wz 009-coupe accelerator pedal

kh6wz 010-coupe accelerator pedal  kh6wz 011-coupe accelerator pedal

kh6wz 012-coupe accelerator pedal  kh6wz 013-coupe accelerator pedal

Part of the pedal box area is the accelerator pedal. Again, instructions are very skimpy on how to put this thing together. Here are some pictures of the gas pedal parts and how to dis-assemble the unit as it comes out of the box, and where it mounts onto the firewall area. Adjustments for the pedal box and accelerator pedal will happen later.

A Christmas Party, the Lytro Camera and a Coupe Goof   Leave a comment

The San Bernardino Microwave Society (SBMS) had a Christmas party this past weekend, and it was a good break from doing sheet aluminum work. The event seemed smaller this year, several of the usual suspects were not able to make it. There was lots of food to share and gifts to exchange. Happily, regular guests Mel WA6JBD and his better half, Tisza KI6DBR came and brought their usual homemade treats, including Tisza’s famous chocolate truffles, microwave dish cookies and a chocolate sculpture. This year’s sculpture was a 10GHz horn and a section of waveguide. And yes, they really do work at 10GHz. Mel measured the return loss of the horn and waveguide and reports more than 17dB or something like that – pretty respectable for an edible 10GHz antenna.

Here are some pictures of the event. . .

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Where else but a ham radio Christmas party would one find a 10GHz horn and waveguide made of chocolate – that actually works

Tisza's homemade chocolate truffles - Yum!

Tisza’s homemade chocolate truffles – Yum!

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Gift exchange crowd

Gift exchange crowd

What in the World is That?

After the party wound down, I stayed to get a closer look at Dennis’ new camera. It does not look anything like a camera, but it really shouldn’t because it makes images in a whole new way and enables a whole new way to enjoy still images. I thought it looked more like a kid’s kaleidoscope, rather than a camera.

The camera and lens system optics look very simple. And that is one of the points: You do not need fancy telephoto or macro lens capability. It is done in software.  There are no fancy controls or buttons, only soft pads on the rubberized parts of the case. There is a power switch, a zoom control and a shutter release. An LCD with touch screen is on the back. Here are some pictures of this new gadget.

WHAT is THAT!

WHAT is THAT!

The Lytro camera. At left is the lens cover, it attaches magnetically. That's an item that will be lost immediately. Center, the camera, showing the front glass and lens. Right - a tripod adaptor.

The Lytro camera. At left is the lens cover, it attaches magnetically. That’s an item that will be lost immediately. Center, the camera, showing the front glass and lens. Right – a tripod adaptor.

As I mentioned on my LinkedIn update, the Lytro camera introduces a paradigm shift in the way we can look at still pictures (pun intended, sorry). At first, I thought this camera simply used some sort of image processing to “fix” images, simple things like contrast and color adjustments and maybe some image manipulation, like PhotoShop. But then Dennis said that you can change focus and “raw image” features, like zooming in – after the image is stored on your computer.

The images are not jpg or other familiar formats – but then – these are not ordinary images, either. You can actually change the depth-of-field – change the point of view of the image.

Watching some of the demos on the Lytros website made me think of scenes from the TV show “CSI:” because you can see an image captured by the camera, and you can actually zoom and move around the various places on the image, and see what else the camera captured.

Visit the Lytro website, pictures and demos and details are worth closer examination. Unfortunately, I don’t have any Lytro images to share – yet.

The Coupe Goof

The day after the party, I went back to work on the Coupe. Something bothered me as I looked at the images and some postings of other builders. The driver’s side footbox and the front, where the pedal box mounts, looked different than mine. And I found another driver side footbox front panel in my box of aluminum parts. I looked at the part number of the “extra” footbox front (15312) on the packing slip, and noticed the description: “Driver Footbox Front Wall, Coupe Wilwood Pedals.”

Argh. Since I have the Complete Kit, it came with a Wilwood pedal box. Part of the confusion is the way Factory Five Racing packed the sheet aluminum – the major parts are held in place on the chassis and are shipped in place. This would be fine for the builders using a donor Mustang pedal box, the “Basic Kit” version.

So, I had to remove the driver side footbox front panel and replace it with the proper one. The good news is that I had all these things in place with Cleco fasteners, not rivets and silicone. And, I used the old panel as a drilling guide for the new panel. Now I have a spare sheet of aluminum I can use for – something. Hatch covers, maybe.

On the left is the wrong driver side footbox front panel. This is the one that is shipped in place on the chassis. The one on the right is the front panel for the Wilwood pedal box. Good thing I didn't silicone and rivet that panel!

On the left is the wrong driver side footbox front panel. This is the one that is shipped in place on the chassis. The one on the right is the front panel for the Wilwood pedal box. Good thing I didn’t silicone and rivet that panel!

Disaster averted - the wrong footbox front panel was removed and replaced with the correct front panel for the Wilwood pedal box.

Disaster averted – the wrong footbox front panel was removed and replaced with the correct front panel for the Wilwood pedal box.