Archive for the ‘FFR’ Tag

Type 65 Coupe Update: Fuel Pump Bracket, Cable Bulkhead Brackets, E-Brake Location   Leave a comment

After something like three or four false starts, I finally settled on a way to mount the external fuel pump on my Coupe. The final solution is so simple, I feel stupid….

First, I tried mounting the pump on the lower brace, under the IRS pumpkin. But that just did not look right, and it was difficult to access from either above or below the car. Then I tried mounting the pump on the Factory Five Metal battery box, but discovered the battery box blocks access to the fill and drain plugs on the differential.

Here is the final answer, a simple, flat plate of 1/8-inch aluminum. This will help simplify the fuel hose routing, too.

IMG_8357-kh6wz - simple fuel pump bracket

More Fabrication

I made a pair of triangular plates to create a bulkhead to hold the e-brake cable and the fuel hoses (one for supply to the engine and one for the return into the tank) on the passenger side of the chassis. An identical plate for the driver side will be used for the other e-brake cable and any wiring harness going to the rear of the car.

Since the 1/8-inch aluminum plate I am using for these brackets is scrap material, some extra holes are sometimes included in the items I make. When I am not able to re-use existing holes, I patch them with JB Weld or epoxy, then paint the item with high temperature BBQ paint. These brackets are finished in silver.

IMG_8387-kh6wz - triangle bracket 1

 

IMG_8400 - kh6wz - triangle bracket 2

The large holes are cushioned with a PCV grommet; it is thick and large enough to pass the 3/8-inch fuel lines nicely.

Here are some views of the passenger-side bracket installed with Clecos:

IMG_8404 kh6wz - triangle bracket installed - P-side

 

 

 

IMG_8406 - kh6wz - triangle bracket - fuel line

Next, I started laying out the e-brake cables and the complete kit e-brake handle. When I installed the rear brakes, I thought the cables looked too short. And last night I noticed that I am correct – the cables supplied with the IRS brake kit are about four to six inches too short.

I may have a solution to this, based on some Forum postings on this same topic — see the photo below. I do not like the turn buckle from the hardware store, I think I should replace it with a stainless steel clevis six to eight inches long to allow for adjustment. (McMaster-Carr items. . . )

IMG_8370 - kh6wz - e-brake assy1

UPDATE: I ordered an e-brake kit from Richard Oben of North Race Cars. (The same place I ordered my air conditioner – yet to be installed). The kit will move the e-brake to a more practical location at the top of the transmission tunnel.

Many builders of the Roadster as well as the Coupe do not like the way the brake cables rub against the big four inch tube. I will make a small Teflon block and mount it to the bottom of the chassis so the cable can slide more easily, and make it look much nicer. More details when I get to that step.

Main Wire Harness
I started laying out the main wire harness. A few weeks ago, I painted the fuse panel with white appliance epoxy paint. This will brighten up the underside of the dash and will prevent corrosion. Based on something I read on the Roadster section of one of the F5R Forums, I added a small hinge to the fuse panel mounting plate. You can see the hinge on the right side of the bracket in this picture:

 

IMG_8408 - kh6wz - fuse panel painted

 

However, this is bad advice, at least for my Coupe application. This is not a good thing to do for several reasons:

1) It moves the fuse block about a quarter-inch forward into the footbox, and adds strain to several wires in the Ron Francis harness supplied with the Complete Kit.

2) The reason for the hinge was to make it possible to swing the entire panel down for easy servicing. However, this is impossible, since there is not enough slack and the thick harness will not allow the fuse panel to simply “swing down.”

3) The mounting holes must be very close to the edge of the 2-inch rail. Removing the hinge makes a better location for the mounting screws.

After removing the hinge, and mounting the fuse panel per the instructions, I noticed some “squishiness” in the fuse panel, which I do not like. I have not seen this mentioned in any post so I thought I would bring it up here.

The fuse panel is a piece of thin aluminum, laser cut to shape to hold the plastic fuse panel. Three zip screws (the self-tapping hex-head screws that held the cockpit aluminum in place when the kit was shipped) fasten it in place under the driver footbox, near the steering column.

All fine and dandy, but the fourth corner is “floating in space” and flexes easily. I decided to add a small aluminum bracket to make the fuse panel stronger (flex less). I hope the bracket does not get in the way of anything to be mounted later….

 

IMG_8422 - kh6wz - added bracket for fuse panel

Type 65 Coupe Update: Cockpit Aluminum, Battery Box and Fuel Lines   Leave a comment

IMG_8000 - kh6wz - 65 Coupe cockpit al

After several weeks, it is good to get back to work on the Factory Five Racing Type 65 Coupe. I finally completed drilling the rivet holes for all cockpit aluminum panels, and added a battery cut-off switch as you can see above.

Here is a hint for builders – there is a fairly large gap in the bottom right corner of the driver’s side floor and the “A” shaped piece that meets the transmission tunnel. I looked at several Coupes and Roadsters and they all have this space. However, by pushing on the A-shaped piece from behind (under the chassis and in the engine bay) – this gap can be closed up nicely. See below. . .

IMG_8007 kh6wz - 65 Coupe cockpit Al - fixed space

IMG_8008 - kh6wz - 65 Coupe cockpit Al - fixed space

 

But what about this area, at the rear of the driver’s side door – indicated by a piece of blue masking tape – see that gap? Does something cover this space up or do I need to fabricate a replacement panel? Both sides look the same.

IMG_8005 - kh6wz - 65 Coupe cockpit Al - correct or not

 

 

As mentioned in a previous post, I finally decided to mount the external fuel pump under the Factory Five Metal battery box. This is a protected location and is a low point on the chassis.

IMG_7910 - kh6wz - 65 Coupe - fuel pump location

One problem will be access to the fill and drain holes for the Ford Racing differential. I had to drill out the rivets previously installed and tapped some 1/4-20 holes – this will enable the removal of the battery box when draining and filling the rear end fluid. Not the ideal situation, but I do not see too many alternatives to this arrangement.

My Ford 302 V8 has an MSD Atomic electronic fuel injection system, and I am running both feed and return fuel lines. Here is a picture of the tank end. . .

IMG_8010 - kh6wz - 65 Coupe - fuel line starts

The fuel line runs from the first filter (right side of the chassis) to the fuel pump, and goes around to the driver side. Then it goes under the rear end to the passenger side of the chassis, where it goes to a second fuel filter mounted under the passenger seat, and finally to the engine.

The same path will be used for the return system. Pretty much standard layout.

Next Build Session

Depending on the weather, I will remove all interior panels and paint the under side with automotive under body paint. It is a rubberized black paint which should deaden some road noise, insulate heat and protect the panels from road debris.

Another item on the next to do list is the wiring harness. Here is a look at the main portion. . .

IMG_8006

Type 65 Coupe Update: Exhaust Side Pipes and More Fuel System Stuff   Leave a comment

I got bored with figuring out the fuel line routing and filtering, and it was a nice warm day today, so I decided to paint the Coupe exhaust system pipes and silencers. Even though they were stored in a corner of my dining room, and were covered with oil, there was a lot of rust forming on the surface of the pipes. My kit is now a little over a year old, and I wanted to prevent further rusting.

Here is the box of pipes and associated mounting hardware from The Factory. . .

Type 65 Coupe Exhaust, Uncoated, from Factory Five Racing, after one year

Type 65 Coupe Exhaust, Uncoated, from Factory Five Racing, after one year

There is an option to get the pipes ceramic coated, I probably should have ordered the exhaust with the coating. I noticed the brochure on the Factory Five Racing website has the exhaust listed as ceramic coated at no charge. I wonder why I missed that part?

I used silver Rustoleum BBQ paint (Ultra) to finish the exhaust. But first, I prepped the pipes with wire brushes, to remove the rust and roughen up the surface, and then wiped them with acetone to degrease so the paint will stick better.

I used a wire brush on a drill motor to get the rust off and roughen the surface.

I used a wire brush on a drill motor to get the rust off and roughen the surface.

Type 65 Coupe side exhaust pipes painted with silver BBQ paint - I think it looks OK.

Type 65 Coupe side exhaust pipes painted with silver BBQ paint – I think it looks OK.

The BBQ paint is a bit soft, I think this is because it needs to expand and contract when heated and cooled. But it will be easy and cheap to touch up.

I am not sure what the final exhaust side pipe color will be, so I sprayed three coats of the silver on just to prevent further rusting. I may change the color to black, since I want the main body to be white.

I did manage to mount the pre-filter for the fuel system. My 302 is fuel injected with an MSD Atomic EFI system, and came with most of the parts, including the fuel filters, hose, and external fuel pump. The first filter mounts where the Factory Five fuel filter is located, near the quad shock mount on the right side of the chassis. The MSD-supplied filter is smaller than the one supplied in the kit, so I had to figure out how to mount it. I am using a pair of electrical conduit clips to mount the first filter, as shown.

Electrical conduit clips are used to mount the first fuel filter to the chassis

Electrical conduit clips are used to mount the first fuel filter to the chassis

The fuel pump will mount to the bottom of the Factory Five Metal battery box. If you have IRS and want to use the same box, you must modify the battery box slightly, as mentioned in an earlier post. In addition, you will have to figure out how to make the battery box removable, since it will block the differential filler plug.

I will be mounting the battery box with nuts and bolts, and mount it so that it can tilt upwards for access to the rear end filler plug. More details and pictures will follow when I get to that chore. Here’s a sneak peek at where the external fuel pump will be mounted.

Type 65 Coupe with IRS - battery box and external fuel pump mounting location

Type 65 Coupe with IRS – battery box and external fuel pump mounting location

Type 65 Coupe Update: Fuel System Begins   Leave a comment

I should have done more homework on this part of the build process, since Factory Five Racing tells us they do not include the fuel system. This makes sense since it will depend on the engine. I have a 302 with an MSD Atomic EFI system, and it came with the (external) fuel pump and filters.

So now I have to figure out how to get from the fuel tank output tube to the first fuel filter, then to the pump and then to the EFI unit. I decided to install a return fuel line, based on the information in the MSD instructions, I hope this extra effort will be worth it.

I will make access holes and hatches for the fuel pump and filter, as well the rear suspension components and tali lights – this should make maintenance and repair easier.

Here are some pictures of the work done today.

Type 65 Coupe fuel pump possible location. This is the external pump that came with the MSD Atomic EFI kit. The first fuel filter will mount to the battery box.

Type 65 Coupe fuel pump possible location. This is the external pump that came with the MSD Atomic EFI kit. The first fuel filter will mount to the battery box.

Using CAD - cardboard aided design, the fuel pump mounting plate is taking shape.

Using CAD – cardboard aided design, the fuel pump mounting plate is taking shape.

Here is the fuel pump in its possible location.

Here is the fuel pump in its possible location.

The cardboard template is transferred to aluminum. The mounting plate is almost a quarter-inch thick, so it will be nice and sturdy. This piece will be drilled and painted later.

The cardboard template is transferred to aluminum. The mounting plate is almost a quarter-inch thick, so it will be nice and sturdy. This piece will be drilled and painted later.

By the way – the fuel tank is still not in its final location – the right side mounting bolts are not long enough. I may just get a length of all-thread and make my own bolt for that side. The left side seems to be OK. Next on the “To Do” list is fill and bleed the brake system.

Type 65 Coupe Update: Battery Box Installation   2 comments

I painted and installed the slightly modified battery box from FFMetal this past weekend. Just to be different, I decided to paint the box white on the inside and black on the outside.

As you recall from my previous Coupe update, the battery box fits very tightly into the chassis – and I figured out a way to install the battery box without scratching up the paint – the trick is to install and build the box piece-by-piece into the chassis space. In other words, do not assemble the battery box and then mount it into the chassis – instead, build the box into the chassis.

NOTE: By building the battery box into the chassis, adjusting one side of the box inward (as described in my previous battery box notes) may not be necessary. Try a dry-fit before you drill the side of the box to change the dimension slightly.

This is actually easy to do, but difficult to explain. Here are some pictures of the freshly-painted battery box installation:

FFMetal battery box for the Type 65 Coupe - the individual parts are inserted into the frame one piece at a time, Cleco-ed into place, and then riveted.

FFMetal battery box for the Type 65 Coupe – the individual parts are inserted into the frame one piece at a time, Cleco-ed into place, and then riveted. (Left side view.)

A close-up of the small cut needed on the left side of the battery box. This cut-out does not interfere with the battery - but the battery clamp bar may have to be moved, depending on where terminals, vents or filler caps are on the battery.

A close-up of the small cut needed on the left side of the battery box. This cut-out does not interfere with the battery – but the battery clamp bar may have to be moved, depending on where terminals, vents or filler caps are on the battery.

Another view of the two-tone battery box. I like the white interior, it makes it look nice and clean. Of course, a lid will cover everything later. . .

Another view of the two-tone battery box. I like the white interior, it makes it look nice and clean. Of course, a lid will cover everything later. . .

Another view. . .

Another view. . .

The battery box with the supplied cover in place. Since I moved one side inwards, one cover screw does not line up properly. This does not bother me too much - I will install a small piano hinge at the upper side of the battery box, and the bottom two screws will hold the cover in place.

The battery box with the supplied cover in place. Since I moved one side inwards, one cover screw does not line up properly. This does not bother me too much – I will install a small piano hinge at the upper side of the battery box, and the bottom two screws will hold the cover in place.

When the trunk floor panels are installed, I will make a cut-out to access the battery compartment. The instruction sheet shows how to make the cut-out in the floor panel, but I will make the cut-out with an easier technique that woodworkers use: A router and pattern bit. I will show how this is done when I get to that stage.

I may make a small finger-hole on the cover so it will be easier to open. Insulation and carpet will cover the entire trunk area later.

Type 65 Coupe Update: Battery Box   Leave a comment

I bought one of the FFMetal battery boxes from Linwood. It really is a nice item, and it is indeed made with precision. However, it is designed for the Factory Five Racing Roadster. And although the Roadster and the Coupe share the same chassis design, they are not identical.

So I did not expect the box to just plug into the trunk area like the Roadster. But I know several builders who have installed the FFMetal battery box successfully into a Type 65 Coupe.

Looking at the Factory Five Racing forums, I found my answer – thanks to “Fluge” and “CJBergquist” for their posts, pictures and advice!

I will be painting the inside and outside of the battery box at the next work session. Stay tuned for more updates….

Type 65 Coupe Update: More Cockpit Aluminum Chores   Leave a comment

On Saturday morning, I remembered that I stopped working on the sheet aluminum. So I decided I should get that Cleco-ed in place so I can get the panels ready for prep and paint. Then I can move on to the fuel tank, and then – finally – install the engine.