Archive for the ‘Arduino’ Tag

Not Your Grandpa’s Ham Radio at San Diego Maker Faire October 3 – 4, 2015   Leave a comment

UPDATE — See what Dennis W6DQ and I did for the San Diego Maker Faire! 

 

MakerFaireFlyer1-San Diego

This is our fourth consecutive year as Makers. The 2015 SD Maker Faire team is Dennis W6DQ and Wayne KH6WZ

Our mission is to change the image of ham radio, making it both contemporary and chic in a hi-tech sort of way. We also want to emphasize how ham radio can be used for science and technology education and a possible career path for youngsters.

Amateur, or ham radio has always included teaching-learning-making-modifying-hacking and networking (making new friends) traditions for over a hundred years. We want to remind people this “new Maker Movement” is not really a new idea. Read my LinkedIn Publish post called “The Original Makers” to learn more about this.

We also want to show everyone that ham radio technology changes with the times, and continues to include both past and present to accomplish one thing: Creating ways to communicate voice and data over the ether, without wires.

Here are some of the projects on display – stay tuned for more stories and pictures after the event!

 

By the way – here are 65 reasons why ham radio continues to survive – and possibly thrive – in a world of instant, global communication fro everyone:

65 Great Things About Ham Radio

CQ magazine celebrates its 65th anniversary by making a list of 65 great things about ham radio. Ham radio can be considered one of the earliest forms of “social media,” “networking” and “making.” Items in italics can be considered “life lessons.”

1. It works when nothing else does
2. It makes you part of a worldwide community
3. The opportunity to help neighbors by providing public service and emergency communications
4. Some of the nicest people you’ll ever meet
5. Some of the smartest people you’ll ever meet
6. Some of the most interesting people you’ll ever meet
7. Some of the most generous people you’ll ever meet (along with some of the cheapest!)
8. Lifelong friendships
9. Friends around the world (including those you haven’t met yet)
10. The opportunity to go interesting places you might not otherwise go to
11. The opportunity to do interesting things you might not otherwise get to do
12. The opportunity to expand your knowledge of geography
13. The opportunity to expand your knowledge of earth and space science
14. Practical uses for high school math
15. Practical uses for high school physics
16. A good way to practice a foreign language
17. A good way to keep in touch with faraway friends and relatives
18. A good way to get driving directions when visiting someplace new (with or without GPS)
19. A good way to find the best places to eat when visiting someplace new (with or without GPS)
20. Finding “non-touristy” off-the-beaten-path places to stay, eat, visit, etc.
21. A good way to learn about virtually any topic
22. A good way to bridge the generation gap
23. A good way to keep tabs on elderly/infirm people
24. People named Joe (Walsh, Rudi, Taylor)
25. How many of your non-ham friends have actually talked to someone in some remote place such as Cape Verde or the Seychelles?
26. How many of your non-ham friends might have talked to an astronaut aboard the space station?
27. How many of your non-ham neighbors might have a satellite uplink station in their basements—or in the palms of their hands?
28. How many of your non-ham neighbors might have a TV studio in their garage?
29. What other hobby group has designed, built, and had launched its own fleet of communication satellites?
30. Where else can you play with meteors?
31. Moonbounce
32. Informal way to improve technical skills
33. Informal way to improve communication skills
34. Introduces a variety of career paths
35. Offers unparalleled opportunities for career networking
36. Opportunities for competition in contesting and foxhunting
37. A good way to collect really cool postcards from around the world (despite the growth of electronic confirmations)
38. Nearly endless variety of different things to do, on and off the air
39. Hamfests
40. Dayton
41. Field Day
42. Working DX
43. Being DX
44. DXpeditions
45. Contesting
46. Award-chasing
47. Double-hop sporadic-E
48. Worldwide DX on 6 meters (once or twice every 11 years) [The current extended sunspot minimum has shown that mechanisms other than F2 propagation can offer intercontinental DX on the “magic band” at any point in the solar cycle.]
49. Tropospheric ducting
50. Gray-line propagation
51. TEP, chordal hops, etc.
52. Getting through on CW when nothing else will
53. Unexpected band openings
54. Building your own gear
55. Using gear you’ve built yourself
56. Operating QRP from some remote location
57. Experimenting with antennas
58. Working DX while mobile or while hiking
59. Experimenting with new modes and new technology
60. The opportunity to help build an internet that doesn’t rely on the internet
61. DXing on your HT via IRLP and Echolink
62. Contributing to scientific knowledge about propagation
63. Keeping track of other people’s GPS units via APRS
64. Ham radio balloon launches to the edge of space, and as always…
65. Reading CQ!

Take a look at the CQ magazine website to find more interesting things about ham radio.

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Maker Faire 2015 Recap – Part 2   Leave a comment

Since pictures are worth a thousand words, here is a 2015 Bay Area Maker Faire recap in images from and around our Not Your Grandpa’s Ham Radio theme booth.

Click here to see the official Bay Area Maker Faire video from 2015

The Bay Area Maker Faire 2015 team: Team Leader Brian Yee W6BY and his wife Pat and daughter Stephanie, Dennis Kidder W6DQ, Lisa Gibbons KF6QNG and Paul Zander AA6PZ

We had working, hands-on ham radio projects including Brian’s (W6BY) 10 GHz ham radio transverter system, a radio-controlled tractor/forklift (ZigBee controller) and the big screen used as an electronic sign.

Dennis W6DQ brought several brand new projects this year, including a working Amateur Radio broadband (WiFi) network with seven nodes, a software-defined radio (SDR) system.

I brought a demonstration comparing old and new technology in antenna tuners. It uses light bulbs for a substitute (“dummy”) antenna.

 

 

There’s so much to see and do. Here are some pictures of what I get a chance to see.

 

Always great to see Tenaya promoting Arduino and Arduino related projects and products!

IMG_1633 wayne yoshida - TENAYA HURST

 

Great shirts and signage – Only at the Maker Faire!

 

Here are the posters we used to describe our projects on display this year.

Slide1 software defined radio

Slide2 software defined radio

Slide3 software defined radio

Slide4 software defined radio

Slide1 Broadband Hamnet

Slide2 Broadband Hamnet

Slide3 Broadband Hamnet

Slide4 Broadband Hamnet

Slide1 Old vs New Antenna Tuners kh6wz

Slide2 Ols vs New antenna tuners kh6wz

KH6WZ - W6DQ APRS poster

KH6WZ - W6DQ APRS poster 2

Directional coupler - SWR meter 1

Directional coupler - SWR meter 2

 

 

A Musical Sculpture at Maker Faire Bay Area 2014   Leave a comment

Here is a wonderful musical sculpture crafted by Christopher T. Palmer on display at the Maker Faire. The piece is called “Nicht mit dem Titel, ein” Google translate says this means “Not with the title, a” or something like that.

It uses restored cuckoo clock whistles, a microcontroller, some model servos. It plays every 15 minutes.

IMG_0146 KH6WZ - cuckoo whistles

 

IMG_0147 kh6wz close up cuckoo whistle and bellows

 

More information on Chris and his  studio can be found here.

Watch the video on YouTube Channel KH6WZ!

More Maker Faire pictures and stories to come! Stay tuned!

Arduino Radar Shield at Maker Faire Bay Area 2014   Leave a comment

University of California, Davis Engineering Project at Maker Faire Bay Area 2014

IMG_0090 kh6wz radar experiment UCDavis

This radar system operates at 2GHz (S-band). The Arduino stack consists of a radio front end, controlled by an Ardunio Uno and signal processing is performed using an Arduino Due. A Bluetooth link moves the data from the radar system to the notebook computer, where the radar information can be seen using a “waterfall” visual display.

IMG_0086 - kh6wz - UCD radar - UNO front end

IMG_0087 - kh6wz UCD radar shield

IMG_0132 - kh6wz - Dr Leo Liu - Daniel - David UCD DART Lab

 

The DART lab is located in Kemper Hall on the UC Davis campus and is led by Dr. Xiaoguang “Leo” Liu, pictured at left. Daniel (center) and David on the right demonstrated the 2GHz radar system to the Maker Faire visitors. For more information on the UC Davis Engineering programs, visit
The Davis Adaptive RF Technology (DART) Lab

UC Davis College of Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering

2014 UC Davis Picnic Day

Not Your Grandpa’s Ham Radio
Maker Faire Bay Area 2014

Not Your Grandpa’s Ham Radio at the Bay Area Maker Faire 2014   Leave a comment

This is our third consecutive appearance at the Bay Area MF, and continues my theme of showing how some ham radio operators continue the tradition of “teaching, mentoring, making, modifying, repairing and improving” radio and radio-related technology. Read my post about ham radio and the Maker movement.

Today’s ham radio operators have an incredible amount of exotic surplus material that can be converted into everyday use on the ham radio bands. Grandpa certainly never heard of surface-mount technology, talking on homemade 47 GHz transmitter-receiver systems or pocket-sized, satellite navigation systems (GPS). But he sure did mentor, make, modify, repair and improve the equipment in his bedroom radio station…..

Not Your Grandpa’s Ham Radio – Maker Faire 2014 Team

Wayne Yoshida KH6WZ

Dennis Kidder W6DQ

Brian Yee W6BY

Marty Woll N6VI

More information on the Maker Faire Bay area.

Here is a gallery of our booth posters for the 2014 Bay Area Maker Faire. More photos, videos and stories will follow. . . . .

What Does Fashion Lack? Microcontrollers, Says Fashion Designer Anouk Wipprecht   Leave a comment

 

Dutch fashion designer Anouk Wipprecht – who mixes high fashion with microprocessors and fiberoptic fabrics, is scheduled to present “Robotic Fashion and Intimate Interfaces” on Saturday May 17 at 11:30 AM on the Center Stage at Maker Faire Bay Area.

Anouk made the microprocessor-controlled fibre optic and LED costumes for the Black Eyed Peas for the Super Bowl XLV half time show.

I met Anouk at a Crash Space meeting in 2011 – she is fascinating!

Learn more about Anouk and her work with Pseudomorphs 

She talks about her experience and how her interest in microcontrollers and robotics made their way into her fashion designs on YouTube

Here is Anouk’s official website